Question of the Day: What GPA is required to earn a Good Student Discount on an auto insurance policy?

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Dec 03, 2018
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Insurance, Question of the Day, Research

Answer: 3.0

Discounts vary by insurer:

Questions:

  • Why do you think that most automobile insurers offer discounts based on good grades? 
  • What else might you want to know about a high school student before providing them with an auto insurance policy? 
  • Why do you think that the insurers seem to offer such varying good student discounts?

Here's the ready-to-go slides for this Question of the Day that you can use in your classroom.

Behind the numbers (Value Penguin):

As you may have heard from the commercials, being a good student could save you and your parents a good deal on car insurance. Aptly titled the "Good Student Discount", it is offered by many major auto insurance carriers and has a variety of ways to qualify.

Who is considered a good student? 

A “good student” may seem like a subjective term, but each company that offers the discount has the same requirements.

  • Age: 16-25
  • Single
  • Full Time Enrolled High School, College or Home Schooling
  • B or 3.0 GPA or Top 20% in Your Class
  • Rank top 20% on either ACT, SAT, PSAT, TAP, PACT, California Achievement Test, Iowa Test of Basic Skills

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Check out the NGPF lesson on Car Insurance 

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About the Author

Tim Ranzetta

Tim's saving habits started at seven when a neighbor with a broken hip gave him a dog walking job. Her recovery, which took almost a year, resulted in Tim getting to know the bank tellers quite well (and accumulating a savings account balance of over $300!). His recent entrepreneurial adventures have included driving a shredding truck, analyzing executive compensation packages for Fortune 500 companies and helping families make better college financing decisions. After volunteering in 2010 to create and teach a personal finance program at Eastside College Prep in East Palo Alto, Tim saw firsthand the impact of an engaging and activity-based curriculum, which inspired him to start a new non-profit, Next Gen Personal Finance.