Question of the Day: What's the cost of a Thanksgiving dinner for ten in 2021?

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Nov 21, 2021
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Budgeting, Question of the Day

Answer: $53.31, 14% increase

Question:

  • Have you noticed inflation (the increases in prices) in items that you or your family purchase in your own lives?
  • Assume you have an extra $10 to spend, what additional food items would you add to this list for Thanksgiving dinner?
    • Do online research to make sure you’re not spending more than $10.
  • What are you thankful for this Thanksgiving season?

Here's the ready-to-go slides for this Question of the Day that you can use in your classroom.

Behind the numbers (Farm Bureau);

Enjoying Thanksgiving dinner with family and friends is a priority for many Americans, but paying attention to how the meal will impact the budget is also important. Farm Bureau’s 36th annual survey indicates the average cost of this year’s classic Thanksgiving feast for 10 is $53.31 or less than $6.00 per person. This is a $6.41 or 14% increase from last year’s average of $46.90.

The centerpiece on most Thanksgiving tables – the turkey – costs more than last year, at $23.99 for a 16-pound bird. That’s roughly $1.50 per pound, up 24% from last year, but there are several mitigating factors.

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About the Author

Tim Ranzetta

Tim's saving habits started at seven when a neighbor with a broken hip gave him a dog walking job. Her recovery, which took almost a year, resulted in Tim getting to know the bank tellers quite well (and accumulating a savings account balance of over $300!). His recent entrepreneurial adventures have included driving a shredding truck, analyzing executive compensation packages for Fortune 500 companies and helping families make better college financing decisions. After volunteering in 2010 to create and teach a personal finance program at Eastside College Prep in East Palo Alto, Tim saw firsthand the impact of an engaging and activity-based curriculum, which inspired him to start a new non-profit, Next Gen Personal Finance.