Question of the Day: What percent of people age 75 and older are still working?

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Jan 09, 2018
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Career, Employment, Question of the Day, Research

Answer: 8.4%

From Bureau of Labor Statistics:                                 

                                                                               1996          2006            2016         2026 

Questions:

  1. Why do you think older people are still working at that age?
  2. How do you think the number of older people still in the workforce will impact you when you look for a job?
  3. Do you think your generation will be more likely to work past 75, compared to the baby boomers?
  4. What factors may determine how long you work that compared to today’s retirees?

Here's the ready-to-go slides for this Question of the Day that you can use in your classroom.

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What's behind the numbers: 1.5 million Americans aged 75 and up are still working.  That number (in percentage terms) has been on the rise and is expected to continue rising.  A recent NYT article profiles some of these folks.  While many work because they are still able and it makes them happy, others work for financial reasons.  The crash of 2008 eroded their nest egg, they are still supporting children, fewer people have pensions, etc.  Why should a teenager care about this?  They are like to live longer than baby boomers (excluding the impact of the opioid epidemic), so if they don’t think they will want to be working after 70 or 75, they will have to be even more financially fit at retirement than those retiring today….and maybe the BLS will have to add a new statistic—number of Americans 90 or older in the workforce!!!!  

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Check out the NGPF Career Unit page for more ideas on projects, activities and other resources to prepare your students for the future. 

 

 

 



About the Author

Beth Tallman

Beth Tallman entered the working world armed with an M.B.A. in finance and thoroughly enjoyed her first career working in manufacturing and telecommunications, including a stint overseas. She took advantage of an involuntary separation to try teaching high school math, something she had always dreamed of doing. When fate stepped in once again, Beth jumped on the opportunity to combine her passion for numbers, money, and education to develop curriculum and teach personal finance at Oberlin College. Beth now spends her time writing on personal finance and financial education, conducting student workshops, and developing finance curricula and educational content. She is also the Treasurer of Ohio Jump$tart Coalition for Personal Financial Literacy.