Question of the Day: How much can a creator on TikTok make if their video receives 1 million views?

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Dec 02, 2020
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Question of the Day, Career, Employment

Hat tip to Brian Page for recommending this question:

Answer: Between $20 and $40 (or 2-4 cents per 1,000 views)

Questions:

  • Have you or any of your friends built an audience on TikTok? How easy or difficult was it? 
  • Are there other ways to make money from having a significant set of followers on TikTok? 
  • Does this information change your opinion of whether you can make a living off of TikTok videos? 

Here's the ready-to-go slides for this Question of the Day that you can use in your classroom.

Behind the numbers (Lifehacker): 

Influencers using the Creator’s Fund report a rate of 2-4 cents per 1,000 views, which means that a relatively successful video of 500,000 views would net you about twenty bucks. On the other hand, it still adds up—prolific creators with tens of millions of followers can rake in between $100,000 to $200,000 annually from the Fund, according to the site Tube Filter. For the vast majority of influencers, however, it’s difficult to make TikTok into a full-time income based on ad revenue alone.

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Wondering about the same question for YouTubers? Here's the answer

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 Lots more questions where this one came from...check out the QoD library here. 

About the Author

Tim Ranzetta

Tim's saving habits started at seven when a neighbor with a broken hip gave him a dog walking job. Her recovery, which took almost a year, resulted in Tim getting to know the bank tellers quite well (and accumulating a savings account balance of over $300!). His recent entrepreneurial adventures have included driving a shredding truck, analyzing executive compensation packages for Fortune 500 companies and helping families make better college financing decisions. After volunteering in 2010 to create and teach a personal finance program at Eastside College Prep in East Palo Alto, Tim saw firsthand the impact of an engaging and activity-based curriculum, which inspired him to start a new non-profit, Next Gen Personal Finance.