Question of the Day (Updated): Which Halloween item do consumers expect to spend the most on in 2020: Decorations, Candy or Costumes?

|
Oct 25, 2020
|
Question of the Day, Purchase Decisions

Answer: Costumes and Decorations are tied at $2.6 billion

Questions:

  • What are your plans for Halloween this year? How would you/your families spending differ from last year's Halloween? 
  • Which spending category had the sharpest decline in 2020?  
  • Would it surprise you to learn that Halloween is the second most popular holiday in terms of consumer spending? Why do you think it's so popular?

Here's the ready-to-go slides for this Question of the Day that you can use in your classroom.

Behind the numbers (National Retail Federation data and press release); 

Consumer spending is expected to reach $8.05 billion, down slightly from $8.78 billion in 2019, due to the drop in participation. However, consumers are spending more on the activities that will ensure a memorable holiday. Those who are celebrating plan to spend $92.12 on average compared with $86.27 in 2019.

-----------------------

Want to deepen your content knowledge, earn 10 Academy credits and a certification badge? Register for an NGPF Certification Course today! 

-----------------------

 Lots more Questions of the Day here! You will never run out of bell ringers:)

 

About the Author

Tim Ranzetta

Tim's saving habits started at seven when a neighbor with a broken hip gave him a dog walking job. Her recovery, which took almost a year, resulted in Tim getting to know the bank tellers quite well (and accumulating a savings account balance of over $300!). His recent entrepreneurial adventures have included driving a shredding truck, analyzing executive compensation packages for Fortune 500 companies and helping families make better college financing decisions. After volunteering in 2010 to create and teach a personal finance program at Eastside College Prep in East Palo Alto, Tim saw firsthand the impact of an engaging and activity-based curriculum, which inspired him to start a new non-profit, Next Gen Personal Finance.