Category: Teaching Strategies

Schools in the News

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Aug 16, 2017
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Schools In News, Teaching Strategies, Behavioral Finance, Personal Finance, Career
Showing Students it’s OK to Not to Have it All (Jump$tart) For MaryBeth, personal finance is – personal. She began her career as a credit union teller and saw that some of her customers lacked basic financial knowledge. To help, she worked to build relationships with her customers and help them be more financially secure. She did this by explaining the difference between debit and credit, helping customers with checkbook reconciliation and loan counseling. Innovative Educator...

Making Student Debt Decisions Personal

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Aug 14, 2017
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Student Loans, Paying for College, Teaching Strategies
I want to welcome Christian Sherrill to the NGPF team. He will be laser-focused on increasing access to financial education in classrooms across the United States. This is a story he wanted to share about why he is so passionate about financial education. ------------------------------- As the new NGPF documentary suggests, millennial college-educated professionals aren’t alone in having made costly investments in student loans. Lifelong educators with multiple degrees have ‘em...

Interactive Handouts Courtesy of Barbara O'Neill and Kerri Herrild!

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Aug 11, 2017
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Interactive, Budgeting, Featured Teachers, Investing, Lesson Idea, Tips for Teachers, Summer Institute, Teaching Strategies
As part of our Summer Institute session, educators had the opportunity to take an engaging personal finance interactive resource and create a handout to accompany it.  Hat tip to Barbara O'Neill of Rutgers University, New Brunswick (NJ) and Kerri Herrild of De Pere High School, De Pere (WI) who shared their finished products with us. For those of you looking for high quality, engaging, resources guaranteed to get your students thinking about their financial mindset, look no further than...

How do YOU teach personal finance?

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Aug 04, 2017
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Flash Surveys, Research, Lesson Idea, Financial Literacy, Teaching Strategies, Front Page Spotlight, Tips for Teachers
The start of school is just around the corner and we know that you’re beginning to think about your coming course load for the year. As personal finance education becomes mandated in a growing number of states, we’re curious: How do YOU teach personal finance? Create your own user feedback survey ...

Schools in the News

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Aug 02, 2017
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Featured Teachers, Personal Finance, Lesson Idea, Financial Literacy, Teaching Strategies, Schools In News, Tips for Teachers
Franklin Military Academy financial literacy course receives high marks (Richmond Free Press) The passionate discussion of Phyllis Jackson’s students can be heard long before reaching her classroom at Richmond’s Franklin Military Academy. On a recent warm afternoon, Ms. Jackson’s students are divided into small groups to tackle an assignment in her economics and personal finance class: To figure out the cost of transportation to and from work and budgeting the money to cover it. At...

Question: How Does America Pay for College?

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Jul 20, 2017
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Current Events, Question of the Day, Research, Student Loans, Teaching Strategies, Chart of the Week
Good bell ringer to get the conversation started about paying for college. Can start the class by asking your students how they think families will pay for college: What are the sources that families tap into? What are 3 most important categories? Once they have given their answers, you can move on to the chart below. Sallie Mae out with their tenth annual study showing how families are covering the cost of college. Lots of interesting graphs, charts, infographics that I will be sharing over...

Cartoons: What Can Dilbert Teach Us About Investing?

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Jul 18, 2017
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Cartoons, Research, Index Funds, Investing, Teaching Strategies, Stocks, Current Events
I was doing some research for an upcoming presentation and looking for ways to bring some levity to that “heavy” topic of investing. I didn’t realize that Dilbert could be such a great source of investing advice but I found myself nodding my head in agreement as I enjoyed this series of cartoons: Message: Don’t mistake an increase in the stock price with “pure genius” when your stock pick may have benefitted from an overall increase in the level of the stock...

Question: Should We Be Teaching Financial Habits or Goals?

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Jun 15, 2017
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Behavioral Finance, Research, Teaching Strategies, Current Events, Article, Tips for Teachers
I can always count on the Farnham Street blog for thought-provoking questions. Their recent post “Habits vs Goals : A Look at the Benefits of a Systematic Approach to Life,” caught my attention because it is something I struggle with. Namely, how can I operationalize ambitious goals into day-to-day habits? Goals can often seem daunting but when you break them down into daily or frequent habitual actions they suddenly seem easier. Here’s the main takeaways from this five minute...

Research Question: How Should We Be Structuring Financial Education To Engage All Students

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Jun 13, 2017
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Teaching Strategies, Research
The answer presented by Punam Keller, Associate Dean for Innovation and Growth at Tuck School of Business presented at 4th Annual OECD/GFLEC Global Policy Research Symposium to Advance Financial Literacy: “Make the student the teacher!” Here’s the video of her presentation (starts at 3 hours 44 minutes) and the cliff notes compiled by NGPF intern, Grace Deng: Challenges to Teaching in Financial Education -Previously, many have emphasized the role of teachers in financial education...

Writing Prompts for Weekly Journaling in Personal Finance

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Jun 11, 2017
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Writing assignment, Question of the Day, Teaching Strategies
Thanks to Brian Page of Reading High School for getting the tweets started and for the multiple contributors to his initial inquiry: What reflection prompts should be required in a student financial literacy journal, as least weekly? The responses are rolling in: Brian Page (and NGPF podcast guest) What did you learn that you will put to practice now or in the near future? What tools did you discover that you plan to use now or in the near future? Ron Lieber, NY Times columnist (and NGPF...

NGPF Podcast: Tim Talks To Teacher-Innovator Tara Kelley of Harwood Union HS (Vermont)

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May 30, 2017
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Credit Cards, Payment Types, Teaching Strategies, Math, Featured Teachers, Podcasts
I had a great conversation recently with NGPF Teacher Innovator Award winner, Tara Kelley, a math teacher from Harwood Union High School in Duxbury, Vermont. Tara created a Spring Break Project (who doesn’t want to plan a spring break vacation?) which allowed her students to explore the cost of using a credit card to pay for their Spring Break vacation. They learned through this activity the impact that changing their monthly credit card payments has on the total interest paid as well...

The Need for Financial Education Is Everywhere...!

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May 11, 2017
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Policy, Personal Finance, Teaching Strategies, Current Events
As we embark on an advocacy strategy that you will see unfold in the weeks and months, I become more convinced everyday that there is a groundswell of grassroots support for making financial education as much a part of K-12 as the three Rs. I also am beginning to recognize the gaping hole that exists for financial programs targeting underserved populations.   This kind of fits the innovation model described in this Clay Christensen Harvard Business Review article where a disrupter targets...

NGPF Podcast: Tim Talks To NGPF's Jessica Endlich and Sonia Dalal About Their New One-Semester Course

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May 10, 2017
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Podcasts, Teaching Strategies, New Products, Tips for Teachers
Today on the podcast we hear from NGPF’s Jessica and Sonia about the new One-Semester Course that they are creating. We often hear from teachers that NGPF has great content but also that there is SO much of it.  Given how busy you are, we wanted to make it easy for you by developing the “greatest hits” of NGPF that you could fit into a semester course. Putting their problem-solving hats on, Jessica and Sonia are in the process of developing a One-Semester Course of exactly...

Interactive: How Does Your Disposable Income Compare to Peers in Other Countries?

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May 09, 2017
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Question of the Day, Research, WebQuest, Teaching Strategies, Current Events, Math, Interactive
From the Guardian comes an interesting interactive which displays long-term trends in disposable income among different age groups in different countries. Students start by entering an age and a country (all G-8 countries are represented) and then see a series of charts that show three different analyses: How has the specific age group seen their real disposable incomes, taking into account inflation, change since 1979? How does their age group stack up with the same age group in different...

Writer's Workshop: Write A Letter To A CEO (And Get A Response)

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May 09, 2017
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Writing assignment, Activity, Research, Teaching Strategies, Current Events, Article, Activities
A recent Ron Lieber column in NY Times got me thinking about a useful skill that all young people should have: how to advocate for oneself in a manner that people in power will respond to. Here’s the crux of his column: Even semiprofessional consumers like me run into our share of problems. These are particularly irksome, since we should probably know better than to find ourselves on the wrong end of a busted product or poorly delivered service. So this week, I’m pleased to share with...

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