Tim Talks To: Allie Nault, Advocate for Financial Education and Miss America's Outstanding Teen

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Jul 30, 2017
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Advocacy, Financial Literacy, Personal Finance, Policy, Podcasts

I know you will enjoy my conversation with Allie Nault, Miss America’s Outstanding Teen for 2016. From working at a 24 hour diner to grilling presidential candidates about our nation’s debt, Allie has a level of composure and maturity well beyond her years. She uses her platform to advocate for financial literacy and she travels throughout the country talking to students, parents, and teachers about the importance of financial education. Listen to this podcast and you will learn about how she went from opening her first Certificate of Deposit when she was four, to investing in McDonald’s at eight, to interning at the top-grossing hotel restaurant in the country this summer. She has an inspiring story to tell. Enjoy!

Details:

  • 0:00~0:58 – Introduction
  • 0:58~1:4- – Path to becoming Miss America’s Outstanding Teen
  • 1:40~4:06 –  Interest in financial education
  • 4:06~5:21 – How McDonald’s stock is “paying for college”
  • 5:21~8:24 – Her financial education growing up
  • 8:24~11;33 – Allie’s interest in advocating for financial education
  • 11:33~18:02 – Postcards from the road
  • 18:02~19:08 – Paying for college
  • 19:08~21:08 – What she loves about teaching young people about money
  • 21:08~21:28 – A word from our sponsor, Next Gen Personal Finance
  • 21:28~27:07 – Interactions with presidential candidates
  • 27:07~29:51 – Sources of confidence
  • 29:51~32:41 – Allie’s personal aspirations
  • 32:41~35:29 – Source of Allie’s inspiration
  • 35:29~38:05 – Advice on how to succeed during internships
  • 38:05~39:57 – Conclusion

Resources:

Notable Quotes:

  • “I started with a CD when I was four years old and when it turned over when I was eight years old, I realized that interest rates are for the birds and you can’t make any money.”
  • “Even if it’s something where they try incorporating it [personal finance] for a few days and aren’t successful because they don’t have enough time,  at least that attempt  and getting kids and young adults to realize it [the importance]  is truly the key.”

About the Author

Tim Ranzetta

Tim's saving habits started at seven when a neighbor with a broken hip gave him a dog walking job. Her recovery, which took almost a year, resulted in Tim getting to know the bank tellers quite well (and accumulating a savings account balance of over $300!). His recent entrepreneurial adventures have included driving a shredding truck, analyzing executive compensation packages for Fortune 500 companies and helping families make better college financing decisions. After volunteering in 2010 to create and teach a personal finance program at Eastside College Prep in East Palo Alto, Tim saw firsthand the impact of an engaging and activity-based curriculum, which inspired him to start a new non-profit, Next Gen Personal Finance.