QoD: Can you name ONE of the most Googled money questions for 2018?

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Mar 31, 2019
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Checking Accounts, Budgeting, Math, Mortgages, Research

Hat tip to Beth Tallman for sending this one along. 

Answer: Here are the top 5:

5. How much is my house worth?

4. What is bitcoin?

3. How to write a check?

2. How much house can I afford?

1. Where is my tax refund? 

Questions:

  • What money question are you most curious about right now?
  • Why do you think that so many people are preoccupied with their tax refund?
  • Are you surprised to see any of these top 5 most Googled questions on this list? 
  • Why do you think that two of the top 5 questions relate to housing? 

Here's the ready-to-go slides for this Question of the Day that you can use in your classroom.

Behind the numbers (Go Banking Rates):

Google really is the place to go if you have burning questions that you’re too ashamed to ask a friend. Google recently released its “Year in Search” list and the topics on many Americans’ minds were the Mega MillionsMeghan Markle and how to eat according to the keto diet plan. But even while the collective public was focused on World Cup updates and midterm election results, some of the most Googled questions concerned personal finance.

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About the Author

Tim Ranzetta

Tim's saving habits started at seven when a neighbor with a broken hip gave him a dog walking job. Her recovery, which took almost a year, resulted in Tim getting to know the bank tellers quite well (and accumulating a savings account balance of over $300!). His recent entrepreneurial adventures have included driving a shredding truck, analyzing executive compensation packages for Fortune 500 companies and helping families make better college financing decisions. After volunteering in 2010 to create and teach a personal finance program at Eastside College Prep in East Palo Alto, Tim saw firsthand the impact of an engaging and activity-based curriculum, which inspired him to start a new non-profit, Next Gen Personal Finance.