QoD: What percent of Americans would be "ok" receiving a regifted gift?

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Dec 18, 2019
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Question of the Day, Budgeting, Ethics

Did you know the Thursday before Christmas is National Regifting Day? Who knew?

Answer: 83%

Questions:

  • Do you think it's ok to regift a gift that you have been given? Why or why not? 
  • Would you be ok if someone regifted a gift to you? 
  • What do you think is the strongest argument in favor of regifting? 
  • While 83% say they would be ok receiving a regifted gift, only about 34% admit to having given a regifted gift. Why do you think there is such a gap between these two stats? 

Here's the ready-to-go slides for this Question of the Day that you can use in your classroom.

Behind the numbers (Credit Donkey):

Times have changed, both culturally and economically, and more and more consumers seem to accept the idea that sometimes it makes sense to regift a gift. When asked if it is okay to receive a regifted gift, an overwhelming 83% of survey respondents said yes.

Although more tolerant of the practice, few respondents have actually tried to pass off an old gift as a new one – or were willing to admit it. Only 34.3% said "yes" when asked if they have regifted something they have received in the past. At the same time, roughly half (49.7%) of respondents said that they suspected that they had been given a regifted gift.

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This will be the final QoD for 2019. We will pick back up again on January 5, 2020. Have a wonderful holiday break and best wishes for a Happy New Year! 

 

About the Author

Tim Ranzetta

Tim's saving habits started at seven when a neighbor with a broken hip gave him a dog walking job. Her recovery, which took almost a year, resulted in Tim getting to know the bank tellers quite well (and accumulating a savings account balance of over $300!). His recent entrepreneurial adventures have included driving a shredding truck, analyzing executive compensation packages for Fortune 500 companies and helping families make better college financing decisions. After volunteering in 2010 to create and teach a personal finance program at Eastside College Prep in East Palo Alto, Tim saw firsthand the impact of an engaging and activity-based curriculum, which inspired him to start a new non-profit, Next Gen Personal Finance.