QoD: What is the fastest growing scam reported to the FTC? a) Tax scams b) Romance scams c) Gift card scams?

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Feb 18, 2019
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Question of the Day, Financial Scams

Answer: Romance scams

I figured now that Valentine's Day was in the rearview mirror, we could show the dark side of romance. 

Here's the chart:

Questions:

  • Why do you think romance scams are so successful and growing so quickly? 
  • Do you know anyone who has fallen for a romance scam? 
  • What are steps that you can take to prevent falling prey to a romance scam? 

Click here for the ready-to-go slides for this Question of the Day that you can use in your classroom.

Behind the numbers (FTC):

People looking for romance are hoping to be swept off their feet, not caught up in a scam. But tens of thousands of reports in Consumer Sentinel show that a scam is what many people find. In 2018, Sentinel had more than 21,000 reports about romance scams, and people reported losing a total of $143 million – that’s more than any other consumer fraud type identified in Sentinel.1 These reports are rising steadily. In 2015, by comparison, people filed 8,500 Sentinel reports with dollar losses of $33 million.

Romance scammers lure people with phony online profiles, often lifting photos from the web to create attractive and convincing personas. They might make up names or assume the identities of real people. Reports indicate the scammers are active on dating apps, but also on social media sites that aren’t generally used for dating. For example, many people say the scam started with a Facebook message. 

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Check out our Financial Pitfalls Unit page for more activities to protect your students! 

 

About the Author

Tim Ranzetta

Tim's saving habits started at seven when a neighbor with a broken hip gave him a dog walking job. Her recovery, which took almost a year, resulted in Tim getting to know the bank tellers quite well (and accumulating a savings account balance of over $300!). His recent entrepreneurial adventures have included driving a shredding truck, analyzing executive compensation packages for Fortune 500 companies and helping families make better college financing decisions. After volunteering in 2010 to create and teach a personal finance program at Eastside College Prep in East Palo Alto, Tim saw firsthand the impact of an engaging and activity-based curriculum, which inspired him to start a new non-profit, Next Gen Personal Finance.