Schools in the News

|
Sep 27, 2017
|
Schools In News, Career, Lesson Idea, This Week In Financial Literacy

When Eric Cardona graduates from high school next year, he will leave with more than a diploma. Cardona will also take with him a full year's worth of credits toward an automotive technician diploma from Northeast. He did it by taking courses through City Stadium Automotive at Green Bay East High School in conjunction with an apprenticeship with an area mechanic.

  • Ohio Official Sees Mandatory Financial Literacy as Key to Solving Student Debt Crisis (Right About Money)

Ohio has had its stumbles on the road to greater financial education in its schools. But Attorney General Mike DeWine is getting religion, seeing it as a way to curb excessive college debt. In a report last month, DeWine’s advisory group on student debt collection put forth 22 recommendations that included a heavy dose of financial literacy. The group’s first point: All Ohio high school students should receive one semester of financial literacy education.

  • Construction career day shows students the opportunities in Nevada’s flourishing growth (Reno-Gazette Journal)

Prevailing wisdom tells high school students that the guaranteed path to financial stability and career success is only found with a university diploma. Students who attend the Construction Career Day on September 28 will see that wisdom challenged when they come face to face with a few dozen exhibitors from the local construction industry and related fields.

Woodland High School teamed up with Microsoft Philanthropies’ partner, Technology Education and Literacy in Schools (TEALS) to offer courses in Computer Science to help prepare students to enter a workforce where having technology skills will provide a leg-up to landing life-long careers.

About the Author

Laura Matchett

After graduating with an education degree and spending 7 years in an elementary classroom, Laura made the switch to the non-profit world and loves interacting with students, educators and business professionals across the country. She is passionate about all students having access to high quality education and views personal finance education as one way to ‘level the playing field’. When Laura is not locating or creating high quality educational resources, you can find her mountain biking or searching for the best ramen in town!