QoD: At what age do more than 50% of kids have a smartphone?

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Nov 04, 2019

Hat tip to Beth Tallman for sharing this resource and recommending as QoD. 

Answer: By age 11, 53% of U.S. kids have a smartphone

Questions:

  • At what age did you or most of your friends get a smartphone? 
  • At your age, is a smartphone a need or a want? Explain. 
  • How do you use your phone to manage your finances (e.g., checking bank balances, using "tap to pay", etc.)? 
  • Based on the chart, has smartphone ownership among U.S. kids increased or decreased since 2015?

Here's the ready-to-go slides for this Question of the Day that you can use in your classroom.

Behind the numbers (from Common Sense Media):

Kids' media preferences are changing as new apps and sleeker technology make it easier to stay connected (and be entertained) wherever they go. Just in the past four years, we've seen dramatic shifts in online video viewing, smartphone ownership, and more. As kids come into their own, the messages they see in digital media will play an even bigger role in their sense of self, their social awareness, their well-being, and their access to information on everything from politics to the latest viral meme.

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 Check out this FinCap Friday to see how smartphones are speeding up the checkout line: Tappity Tap.

 

About the Author

Tim Ranzetta

Tim's saving habits started at seven when a neighbor with a broken hip gave him a dog walking job. Her recovery, which took almost a year, resulted in Tim getting to know the bank tellers quite well (and accumulating a savings account balance of over $300!). His recent entrepreneurial adventures have included driving a shredding truck, analyzing executive compensation packages for Fortune 500 companies and helping families make better college financing decisions. After volunteering in 2010 to create and teach a personal finance program at Eastside College Prep in East Palo Alto, Tim saw firsthand the impact of an engaging and activity-based curriculum, which inspired him to start a new non-profit, Next Gen Personal Finance.