Category: Chart of the Week

Chart of the Week: Investment Returns By Decade

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Jan 14, 2020
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Chart of the Week, Investing, Index Funds
I came across this cool gif on the Irrelevant Investor blog. Lots of percentages here which make this an interesting one for math teachers too!  Be sure to click on the image below to experience the GIF:  Notes: Important: Given the multitude of asset classes here with some familiar and some unfamiliar, you may want to just focus on two bond proxies (5 Year U.S. Treasuries and Long-Term Corporate Bonds) and two stock proxies (S&P 500 and NASDAQ). Of course, if you cover other...

Chart of the Week: Auto Loan Terms

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Jan 06, 2020
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Budgeting, Behavioral Finance, Chart of the Week
This chart ties in well with today's Question of the Day which equates longer auto loan terms with higher interest costs for borrowers.    Questions: Which loan term has grown most dramatically in the last decade? Which loan term has declined the most? Why do you think that seven year loan terms have become so popular?  Do you think that having a long-term car loan is a wise choice? Why or why not? ---------------------- Here's our question of the day about the increased cost...

Chart of the Week: Manufacturing jobs require more skills!

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Dec 17, 2019
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Chart of the Week, Career, Economics, Employment
From WSJ article:  Specialized job requirements have narrowed the path to the middle class that factory work once afforded. The new, more advanced manufacturing jobs pay more but don’t help workers who stopped schooling early. More than 40% of manufacturing workers have a college degree, up from 22% in 1991. “The workers that remain do much more cognitively demanding jobs,” said David Autor, an economics professor at MIT. Looking ahead, investments in automation will...

Infographic of the Week: How Municipal Bonds Helped Build the Nation

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Dec 10, 2019
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Chart of the Week, Did You Know...?
A nice cross-curricular opportunity to fuse history and personal finance. Bonds can be a tricky topic for educators but if you just think of them as IOUs and municipal bonds as money that government entities borrow for infrastructure then suddenly they become more tangible. Click the image to go directly to the infographic.  Questions: What was the first public project funded by municipal bonds?  What are three large infrastructure projects funded by municipal bonds?  What...

Chart of the Week: What happens in an internet minute?

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Dec 02, 2019
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Chart of the Week
This one is for the math teachers out there. Have your students analyze both pie charts to see how activities on the internet have changed over the past year: Questions: Compare activities on the internet for 2018 and 2019 Be sure that the year over year comparisons you are analyzing have the same units.  Which activities grew the most on a percentage basis?  Which activities grew the least on a percentage basis?   Make your predictions for 2020 for each of the...

Map of the Week: What's the most iconic restaurant chain founded (or headquartered) in your state?

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Nov 25, 2019
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Chart of the Week, Budgeting, Research
Hat tip to Jadrian Wooten, Penn State educator, who tweeted about this recently:  It's Thanksgiving week, so thoughts turn to food. Let's just enjoy the map and I can hear the debates going on in your classroom about your student's favorite restaurant chain.   Wondering how the decisions were made on what chain to list on the map? --------------------- Food is one of your students' largest expense. Which snack brands are most favored by your students? We have a Question of the...

Chart of the Week: What's the relationship between credit card balances and credit scores?

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Nov 20, 2019
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Chart of the Week, Credit Cards, Credit Scores
Definitely some surprises here...   From Experian, State of Credit Cards:    Questions:  Those with _______________ credit scores have the highest credit card balances while those with ______________ credit scores have the lowest credit card balances.  What has been the overall trend with credit card balances for all credit scores since 2011?  Do you think that taking out more credit on a credit card is a sign of consumer optimism or pessimism?  Consumers...

Chart of the Week: How does net worth vary by age?

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Nov 11, 2019
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Chart of the Week, Personal Finance, Research
Net Worth is an important concept for your students to grasp. It is basically calculated as assets (think savings accounts, investment accounts, a home, a car) minus liabilities (car loan, mortgage, credit card debt).  This chart from Flowing Data introduces this concept of net worth and shows how it varies by age: Questions: What are examples of financial assets?  When does debt (red bars) hit its peak? Can you explain why?  When do assets peak (green bars) for individuals? Can...

Chart of the Week: Who has health care insurance?

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Nov 06, 2019
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Chart of the Week, Insurance, Budgeting
Interesting interactive on Visual Capitalist highlights how Americans differ by age. The chart below shows how health insurance coverage changes based on age?  Questions: At what age are the most Americans have health insurance coverage? Why do you think this is the case?  At what age do the least Americans have health insurance coverage? Why do you think this age group doesn't have health insurance?  What do you think are the factors that impact whether or not someone chooses...

Chart of the Week: Social Media and Halloween Spending

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Oct 29, 2019
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Chart of the Week, Purchase Decisions, Behavioral Finance
Courtesy of National Retail Federation: Questions: Write a one sentence summary for this chart. Finish this sentence: Since 2015, social media has had a ________________ impact on Halloween purchases.  Which social media platform has seen the largest increase since 2015? Do you think this will continue?  The data in the chart came from surveying adults. Complete a chart like this for 2019 based on responses from classmates.  How did social media influence any purchases you may...

Visualization of the Week: How does your state compare on various economic factors?

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Oct 15, 2019
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Chart of the Week, Career, Employment, Insurance
Stumbled upon this visualization on the Census Bureau website which provides state level data on a variety of economic factors, including: Age (median) Commuting to work (mean travel time) Computer and internet access Education (percent of high school graduates) Employment status Health insurance coverage Household income Here's the map with commute times by state: Questions: Go through each of the economic factors listed for your state and list the data for your state (e.g., our state has a...

Chart of the Week: New Car Loans

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Oct 08, 2019
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Chart of the Week, Purchase Decisions, Budgeting, Behavioral Finance
Summary: This chart shows the percentage of new car loans and the term of their loans (in months).  Questions: How would you summarize the trend in the length of new car loans over the past decade? Increasing or decreasing? Which loan term has seen the sharpest increase in the past decade?  What is the relationship between the term of the loan and the amount of the monthly payment? The longer the loan term, the _______ the monthly payment.  The _________ the loan term, the...

Chart of the Week: What is your go-to for product research: social networks or Google?

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Oct 01, 2019
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Chart of the Week, Behavioral Finance
From Visual Capitalist:                                                           Gen Z  Millenial  Gen X   Boomers  Gen Z  Millenial  Gen X   Boomers Questions: Where do you do you product research? Does the answer vary based on the product that you are researching? What social media sites do you use most...

Chart of the Week: Employment and Wage Data by Educational Level

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Sep 10, 2019
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Career, Paying for College, Chart of the Week
Good reminder of the value of education on one chart: Questions: What headline would you give to this chart?  Your friend says "education isn't worth it!" Agree or disagree with them using evidence from the chart.  What is the difference in weekly earnings for a person with a bachelor's degree (four year college) compared to a person with a high school diploma? That is the weekly difference, what would be the annual difference?  Fill in the blanks by picking one of the terms:...

Chart of the Week: Who's Moving?

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Sep 03, 2019
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Chart of the Week, Career, Research
There's a lot going on in this chart: The blue bars measure the # of movers with the scale on the left hand side. For example, in 2018, it appears that 32 million people (scale is in thousands) moved.  Black line shows the Mover Rate (percentage of people moving in a given year) with the scale measured on the right side of the graph. For example, in 2018, the mover rate was about 10%.  Questions: What do you think are the reasons that people move?  What's the overall trend in...