Category: Chart of the Week

Chart of the Week: What is this chart measuring?

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Mar 30, 2020
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Chart of the Week, Career, Employment
Chart of the week now in presentation form with a chart, some questions and references. Enjoy!...

Chart of the Week: What has been the trend in interest rates over the past 700 years?

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Mar 17, 2020
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Chart of the Week, Credit Cards
From Visual Capitalist:    Interesting visual showing the history of interest rates since 1310. Perfect to share with your European history teachers. Here were the closing interest rates on debt issued by the U.S. Treasury over the past two weeks:  Note that on 3/9/20, all Treasuries from 1 month to 30 years were yielding under 1%...truly incredible!  Questions:  What has been the long-term trend in interest rates since 1310?  The purple dots on the far right are...

Chart of the Week: What are the sources of state tax revenue?

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Mar 10, 2020
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Chart of the Week, Taxes
Hat tip to Jessica for finding this resource on howmuch.net regarding state taxes.    Questions: What are the top 5 sources of state taxes?  Are you surprised by any of these taxes that are collected and the amounts? Which of the state taxes do you think you will pay at some point in your life?  What is the sales tax in your area?  --------------------- Thanks to NGPF super intern Ansh for compiling the last 20+ Charts of the Week in this document. ...

Chart of the Week: How have historical events affected the Dow over the past 120 years?

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Mar 03, 2020
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Investing, Chart of the Week, Research, Stocks
With the stock market last week undergoing its worst week since 2008, it's instructive to take the long view, the very long view. Here's a chart of the Dow Jones over the past 120 with historical events superimposed on the chart.    Questions: What historical event required the longest recovery time for the Dow Jones Industrial Average?  What historical event caused the last big drop in the stock market (before last week's decline)?  Find 2-3 historical events on the chart...

Chart of the Week: What do mean and median statistics tell us about income distribution in a country? (Updated)

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Feb 28, 2020
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Chart of the Week
This blog post looks at income distribution in a country through the lens of means and medians. Math teachers will love this as students will need to think critically about what these statistics can tell them about level of income disparities within a country. Here's a portion of the chart: As you might gather from looking at this chart, those countries that have the largest difference between the mean (average) and the median have the highest degree of income disparities.  Questions:...

Chart of the Week: Trends in Worldwide Population (1950-2050)

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Feb 24, 2020
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Chart of the Week, Did You Know...?
Fascinating chart showing trends in world population and predictions for the future (Yale GlobalOnline)  Questions:  What are three major trends you can identify from this chart that have occurred between 1950 and 2020?  Do most of the trends you identified represent improvements in the standard of living around the world?  What do you see as the most significant change projected to occur between 2020 and 2050?  One of the changes happening in many developed...

Chart of the Week: How does monthly take-home pay vary in major U.S. cities?

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Feb 17, 2020
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Taxes, Chart of the Week
Hat tip to Jessica for finding this chart at Howmuch.net Methodology: Take-home pay calculated after deductions for federal and state income taxes and Social Security/Medicare taxes.  Questions: Since federal taxes are consistent across all of these cities, the difference in take-home pay is driven by differences in state income tax rates. What is the difference between the cities with the highest take-home pay and the cities with the lowest take-home pay (in dollars)?  A $100,000...

Chart of the Week: How do auto insurance premiums vary by age?

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Feb 11, 2020
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Chart of the Week
From Zebra State of Insurance report:  Questions: Using data from the chart above, explain why 16-17 year olds pay the highest insurance premiums?  What age group has the lowest premiums? Why do you think that is the case?  Based on the data above, at what age do you think driving skills first start to deteriorate?  As cars continue to add safety features, what impact do you think that will have on accident rates? on premiums?  ------------------- Thanks to NGPF super...

Chart of the Week: Largest Advertisers in the U.S.

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Feb 04, 2020
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Advertising, Chart of the Week, Purchase Decisions
Hat tip for Kareem for highlighting this chart.  You might know think advertising is a big market. This chart shows you exactly how big it is and breaks it out by sector.  Question: What are the reasons that companies advertise?  Which company's ads do you tend to see most frequently from the list above? Where do you see their ads (physical world, TV, digital world) Which three companies spend the most on advertising? What types of products do each of them sell (may require some...

Chart of the Week: The value of diversification in two charts

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Jan 28, 2020
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Chart of the Week, Investing, Index Funds
What makes investment diversification so difficult for us mere mortals is that you will never feel like you have the optimal portfolio and have that nagging frustration of "what if...". For example, while many investment professionals encourage investors to have some exposure to international stocks in their portfolio, that has not been a winning strategy for the past decade as the U.S. stock market has vastly outperformed the rest of the world as this chart indicates: Note: MSCI ACWI is an all...

Teach The Triangle: Making Purchase Decisions

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Jan 21, 2020
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Purchase Decisions, Chart of the Week, Behavioral Finance
Hat tip to Erica Pavlik of Neuqua Valley High School who reached out and suggested we curate resources to help "Teach the Triangle," an instructional idea created by her principal, Lance Fuhrer. Here's how she explained this concept:  "It is like your data crunch but taken a step farther. It collects three types of data (image, article & graph) on a similar topic and ask students one question: What can you infer from this?" We thought we would give it a go. Here are three resources...

Chart of the Week: Investment Returns By Decade

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Jan 14, 2020
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Chart of the Week, Investing, Index Funds
I came across this cool gif on the Irrelevant Investor blog. Lots of percentages here which make this an interesting one for math teachers too!  Be sure to click on the image below to experience the GIF:  Notes: Important: Given the multitude of asset classes here with some familiar and some unfamiliar, you may want to just focus on two bond proxies (5 Year U.S. Treasuries and Long-Term Corporate Bonds) and two stock proxies (S&P 500 and NASDAQ). Of course, if you cover other...

Chart of the Week: Auto Loan Terms

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Jan 06, 2020
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Budgeting, Behavioral Finance, Chart of the Week
This chart ties in well with today's Question of the Day which equates longer auto loan terms with higher interest costs for borrowers.    Questions: Which loan term has grown most dramatically in the last decade? Which loan term has declined the most? Why do you think that seven year loan terms have become so popular?  Do you think that having a long-term car loan is a wise choice? Why or why not? ---------------------- Here's our question of the day about the increased cost...

Chart of the Week: Manufacturing jobs require more skills!

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Dec 17, 2019
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Chart of the Week, Career, Economics, Employment
From WSJ article:  Specialized job requirements have narrowed the path to the middle class that factory work once afforded. The new, more advanced manufacturing jobs pay more but don’t help workers who stopped schooling early. More than 40% of manufacturing workers have a college degree, up from 22% in 1991. “The workers that remain do much more cognitively demanding jobs,” said David Autor, an economics professor at MIT. Looking ahead, investments in automation will...

Infographic of the Week: How Municipal Bonds Helped Build the Nation

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Dec 10, 2019
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Chart of the Week, Did You Know...?
A nice cross-curricular opportunity to fuse history and personal finance. Bonds can be a tricky topic for educators but if you just think of them as IOUs and municipal bonds as money that government entities borrow for infrastructure then suddenly they become more tangible. Click the image to go directly to the infographic.  Questions: What was the first public project funded by municipal bonds?  What are three large infrastructure projects funded by municipal bonds?  What...