Question of the Day: What fraction of students receive scholarships or grants for college?

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Oct 23, 2017
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Paying for College, Research, Question of the Day, Current Events

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Answer (from College Board): About 2/3 of college students receive scholarships or grants

I thought given all the focus on student loans, it is instructive to see that a majority of students receive support in the form of grants and scholarships that don't need to be repaid. 

Questions 

  1. Would you choose a college just based on how much scholarship or grant aid you receive from them? Why or why not?
  2. Aside from the percentage of students receiving scholarship or grant aid, what else would you want to know when researching colleges?
  3. What are other ways that you can pay for college besides scholarships or grants? 
  4. How are scholarships and grants different from loans?

Here's the ready-to-go slides for this Question of the Day that you can use in your classroom.

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About the Author

Tim Ranzetta

Tim's saving habits started at seven when a neighbor with a broken hip gave him a dog walking job. Her recovery, which took almost a year, resulted in Tim getting to know the bank tellers quite well (and accumulating a savings account balance of over $300!). His recent entrepreneurial adventures have included driving a shredding truck, analyzing executive compensation packages for Fortune 500 companies and helping families make better college financing decisions. After volunteering in 2010 to create and teach a personal finance program at Eastside College Prep in East Palo Alto, Tim saw firsthand the impact of an engaging and activity-based curriculum, which inspired him to start a new non-profit, Next Gen Personal Finance.