Question of the Day: What is the top-selling fast food category: Snacks, Burgers or Pizza?

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Nov 03, 2020
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Question of the Day, Budgeting

Answer: Burgers with $81.6 Billion in sales in 2019

Questions: 

  • How much of your personal food budget goes to "fast food?"
  • How do you think COVID-19 has impacted fast food sales? Do you think this will be a temporary or lasting change? 
  • Have you seen more examples of healthier options being offered at fast-food restaurants? What do you think is causing this trend? 

Click here for the ready-to-go slides for this Question of the Day that you can use in your classroom.

Behind the numbers (Visual Capitalist)

Burger joints remain the most popular fast food option among consumers—14 of the 50 chains on the list are classified as burger restaurants, with $80 billion in collective sales.

Snacks come in at second place, with a total of $36 billion in revenue. Boasting a broad variety of foods from iced coffee to donuts and ice cream, six of the restaurants on the list are included in this category. Starbucks is the most popular, followed by Dunkin’ and Dairy Queen respectively.

While the chicken and sandwich categories both have nine restaurants included in the ranking, chicken restaurants outsold sandwiches by almost $1 billion

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What's NGPF's most popular budgeting activity? The Bean Game's virtual adaptation is drawing rave reviews!

 

 

 

 

About the Author

Tim Ranzetta

Tim's saving habits started at seven when a neighbor with a broken hip gave him a dog walking job. Her recovery, which took almost a year, resulted in Tim getting to know the bank tellers quite well (and accumulating a savings account balance of over $300!). His recent entrepreneurial adventures have included driving a shredding truck, analyzing executive compensation packages for Fortune 500 companies and helping families make better college financing decisions. After volunteering in 2010 to create and teach a personal finance program at Eastside College Prep in East Palo Alto, Tim saw firsthand the impact of an engaging and activity-based curriculum, which inspired him to start a new non-profit, Next Gen Personal Finance.