Schools in the News

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Apr 26, 2017
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Schools In News, Research, Financial Literacy, Teaching Strategies, This Week In Financial Literacy, Article, Featured Teachers

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  • How Microlending Builds Financial Literacy Skills and Empowers Students (Education Week)

Teachers understand that creating authentic, real-world learning experiences engage students in a way that improves learning and makes it more enjoyable. At Town School for Boys in San Francisco, 6th graders engage in a yearlong study of microfinance using project-based learning that explores what it means to run a business while developing meaningful success skills along the way. While global education initiatives have traditionally focused on humanities and science classes, the boys find many lessons of mathematics complement their journey while partnering with nonprofit Kiva.org, which is headquartered in San Francisco.

First period at Bennett High School was interrupted Monday by a rock concert. At least it started out that way. The Nashville-based, Kansas-bred band GOODING rocked the high school’s auditorium for four or five songs before the band’s lead singer and namesake turned teacher and gave the howling crowd of students a lesson on a subject they don’t often hear about in the classroom: money. “Raise your hand if you want to buy a car,” he said.

  • Centennial students learn about money (Outlook)

Students at Centennial High School have gained financial literacy skills thanks to an online course sponsored at the school by the regional bank, Washington Federal. Students who participated in the Financial Scholars program got to chat with Washington Federal executives Tuesday, March 14. They also received certificates of participation in the program during a recognition ceremony. Ben Petersen, a math teacher at Centennial, said the online course is part of the high school’s consumer and financial math class. About 180 kids, mostly seniors, participated.

  • Financial literacy is better learned early (mySA)

What do you do if you are 25 years old, the $100,000-a-year job in the Eagle Ford Shale you landed out of high school just went bust, and the only employment you can get is as a school custodian earning $16 an hour? Living on one-third of what you once made is bad enough for a single person, but it is much more complicated if you have a wife and three kids younger than 5 to consider.

  • 100 Best w!se High Schools Teaching Personal Finance (w!se)

First published in 2013, the 100 Best w!se High Schools national ranking recognizes the top 100 performing high schools in w!se’s national network, showcases excellence in nancial education and motivates schools to “race to the top” in personal nance instruction. The ranking also encourages school districts and administrators to expand and improve the quality of personal nance instruction in their schools and elevate the importance of nancial education.

 

 

About the Author

Laura Matchett

After graduating with an education degree and spending 7 years in an elementary classroom, Laura made the switch to the non-profit world and loves interacting with students, educators and business professionals across the country. She is passionate about all students having access to high quality education and views personal finance education as one way to ‘level the playing field’. When Laura is not locating or creating high quality educational resources, you can find her mountain biking or searching for the best ramen in town!