A Weekly Round-Up: Schools in the News

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Nov 09, 2016
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Schools In News, Behavioral Finance, Budgeting, Personal Finance, Financial Literacy, Teaching Strategies, This Week In Financial Literacy, Employment

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Students at Provine High School will soon be able to open up accounts with Hope Credit Union right in their own hallway. The project started as a partnership between Provine High School’s Business and Finance Academy and Hope Credit Union. In the program, students participated in workshops, learning about financial literacy, how credit unions work and the importance of saving money from staff at Hope as well as their own teachers who received training from the credit union.

As a former federal bankruptcy judge, John Ninfo has plenty of reasons to consider financial literacy as an indispensable necessity. He has seen too many lives harmed by bad financial choices and believes that far fewer college graduates would be saddled with debt had they borrowed more wisely in what he has called “a national epidemic of financial illiteracy.” Ninfo, 70, spends much of his time giving his message to students.

“How much will cost to rent a two-bedroom apartment? How much will a cell phone plan cost? What about if I buy a used car? How about getting a student loan? Will my monthly salary cover my expenses? Did I pick the right career?” These are just a few of the many questions that Marlborough High School (MHS) seniors asked volunteers as they visited the various businesses and organizations at the annual Reality Fair held on Nov. 1st.

  • Bank Preaches Benefits of Savings to Pupils in Nigeria  (The Guardian)

In line with the Central Bank guidelines on taking banking to the grassroots, the management of United Bank for Africa (UBA), recently organised an interactive session with students of Olivet Baptist High School, Oyo, Oyo State. The bank’s team headed by the Executive Director, Lagos and West banks, Ayoku Adeoye Liadi, told The Guardian that the aim of the campaign is to encourage savings among the upcoming generations in the country.

About the Author

Laura Matchett

After graduating with an education degree and spending 7 years in an elementary classroom, Laura made the switch to the non-profit world and loves interacting with students, educators and business professionals across the country. She is passionate about all students having access to high quality education and views personal finance education as one way to ‘level the playing field’. When Laura is not locating or creating high quality educational resources, you can find her mountain biking or searching for the best ramen in town!