Reading List for April 9-11

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Apr 09, 2021
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Financial Literacy, Economics, Investing, Cryptocurrencies, Mortgages

Financial Literacy

 

Investing

  • NFTs seem to have been a flash in the pan. (The Atlantic)
  • Jamie Dimon’s annual letter to shareholders got some press this week. JPMorgan Chase’s

 

Cryptocurrency

  • Crypto market cap hits record $2 trillion. (Reuters)

 

Economics

  • Producer prices increased more than expected in March, showing the biggest monthly increase since 2011. (CNBC)
  • Weekly unemployment claims ticked back up this past week. (Yahoo Finance)
  • Companies are having trouble hiring workers as they open back up. (Morning Brew)
  • This summary of research done by the San Francisco Fed measures the impact of the pandemic on labor force participation of parents during the pandemic. (FRBSF)
  • Two article look at the Covid economy through the same lens, supply and demand from the consumer end. (Yahoo Finance) (NYT)

 

Mortgages

  • This article from Knowledge@Wharton provides a framework to evaluating mortgages and demonstrates how much is lost by not shopping around. It might be good to augment a mortgage lesson.

 

 

Student Loans

  • The CFPB issued guidance for everyone with (Federal) student loans regarding relief efforts aimed at borrowers during Covid.

 

Financial Health

  • The NY Times Upshot article examines the differences found in the brain/development of children living in poverty, and stimulus checks raising children out of poverty this year may have a broader positive impact. (NYT)

 

Higher Education

  • The Pandemic hit community colleges as hard as it hit the communities they serve. (NYT)

About the Author

Beth Tallman

Beth Tallman entered the working world armed with an MBA in finance and thoroughly enjoyed her first career working in manufacturing and telecommunications, including a stint overseas. She took advantage of an involuntary separation to try teaching high school math, something she had always dreamed of doing. When fate stepped in once again, Beth jumped on the opportunity to combine her passion for numbers, money, and education to develop curriculum and teach personal finance at Oberlin College. Beth now spends her time writing on personal finance and financial education, conducts student workshops, and develops finance curricula and educational content. She is also the Treasurer of Ohio Jump$tart Coalition for Personal Financial Literacy.