Question of the Day: What percent of workers with a college degrees have jobs that could be done from home?

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May 20, 2020
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Question of the Day, Career, Research

With lots of talk about how the coronavirus may have long-lasting effects on the workplace (for more check out last week's FinCap Friday), the answer to this question highlights how workers with a college education have more options when it comes to where their work gets done. 

Answer: 62%

Questions:

  • What types of jobs can be done from home? 
  • Do you think that the workplace changes that came about due to the coronavirus will persist enabling more people to work from home?
  • What do you think are the pros/cons of working from home?
  • Would you want to have a job where you could work from home a few days a week? all the time? 

Click here for the ready-to-go slides for this Question of the Day that you can use with your students. 

Behind the numbers (Pew Research):

In February, before the economic impact of the coronavirus outbreak truly took hold, 40% of American workers, or 63 million, were employed in occupations that potentially could be performed remotely, such as computer programmers, economists and human resource managers.

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About the Author

Tim Ranzetta

Tim's saving habits started at seven when a neighbor with a broken hip gave him a dog walking job. Her recovery, which took almost a year, resulted in Tim getting to know the bank tellers quite well (and accumulating a savings account balance of over $300!). His recent entrepreneurial adventures have included driving a shredding truck, analyzing executive compensation packages for Fortune 500 companies and helping families make better college financing decisions. After volunteering in 2010 to create and teach a personal finance program at Eastside College Prep in East Palo Alto, Tim saw firsthand the impact of an engaging and activity-based curriculum, which inspired him to start a new non-profit, Next Gen Personal Finance.