Schools in the News (December 2018)

|
Dec 27, 2018
|
Schools In News

Cedar High students celebrate financial literacy course (Iron County Today)

“Cedar High School students in LeAnn Leavitt’s (who is an NGPF user--can we note this somewhere?) financial literacy class marked the occasion on Tuesday, Nov. 20, with birthday cake and an extra serving of financial wisdom delivered by Zions Bank employee Megan Hutchinson.

“As a nation, we often talk about the state of Americans’ finances in terms of negative news and the many ways people are falling short,” said Scott Bealer, manager of Zions Bank’s Cedar City branch.  “It’s a pleasure to recognize these students and the progress we are making in Utah by celebrating this 10-year milestone in financial literacy.”

Waynesboro Area Senior High School puts the fun in finance (Herald-Mail Media)

“The high school’s business department partnered with the Rotary Club of Waynesboro to put on a financial literacy fair Wednesday. Students split their time between playing trivia games and budgeting based on hypothetical careers and income levels.

‘The main thing I’ve taken out of personal finance is how to manage a budget,” [Derek Buhrman] said. ‘I think personal finance is going to be one of the most important classes here because everyone is going to have to do a budget.’”

Personal Finance Should Be More of a Priority in High Schools (The Rebellion – Walpole High School’s Student Newspaper)

“Many students do have some experience handling money, but only on a limited scale. Informing students how to handle money on a larger scale is the basis of personal finance. While a mandatory personal finance class certainly will not guarantee individual personal financial responsibility, it is surely an improvement the current system: Massachusetts has no requirements for teaching financial literacy at the high school level.

Financing one’s education is a pivotal aspect of the college application process. Students should not be expected to accept, or even apply for, financial aid if they do not even know what exactly that means. Students must understand the rudimentary basics of the terms of their offers to gauge the value of one university versus another."

Personal finance class hosts school-wide career fair (Hillsdale Daily News)

“The event sprawled the main area of the multi-media center with seniors in the personal finance class presenting information on careers they are interested in pursuing to their fellow students from the elementary school, middle school and high school.

The district believes the presentations were helpful in allowing students of all ages to see different careers and how seniors are preparing for those careers.”

“Offering an educational spin on the classic board game Life, Making Cents of Life After College is designed to introduce students to the realities awaiting them after graduation and the resources available to help them…

Students were issued paper play money to use throughout the stations, which mimicked real-life expenses including food costs, rent allowance, healthcare and entertainment and leisure-related expenses.

...After completing the circuit of advising stations, students were counseled to review their budget decisions with a financial adviser, who would recommend lifestyle changes such as finding a roommate or taking on a second job.”

About the Author

Danielle Bautista

Danielle is a native of Southern California and a recent graduate from the University of Maine, where she braved the frigid winters—a feat in and of itself—and earned her Bachelor's degree in International Affairs. She has a passion for working with non-profit organizations and serving populations in underprivileged communities. When Danielle isn't writing NGPF blog posts, spearheading various outreach projects, or managing contests and flash surveys, you can find her doing some sort of outdoor activity, learning a new hobby, or cracking what she thinks are witty puns!