Category: Retirement

Interactive Monday: How does life expectancy vary by neighborhood?

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Nov 11, 2018
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Research, Retirement, Behavioral Finance, Interactive
The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation has an interactive that allows a user to type in their home address (info not stored by the site) and find out their life expectancy. I typed in the address for my hometown in New Jersey where I lived the first 22 years of my life and here's what I found: Here's how I thought you might use this in your classroom: Have students type in their home address including zip code. How does the life expectancy of "My area" compare to the county, the state and the...

Reading List for November 3-4

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Nov 02, 2018
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Financial Literacy, Cryptocurrencies, Economics, Paying for College, Retirement, Insurance
Financial Literacy A survey by Ipsos on behalf of MNT, Ltd reveals that apparently, Canadians need help with financial literacy education as well. The Visual Capitalist depicts the US problem with financial literacy in pictures. Economics/Cryptocurrency 250,000 jobs added this month, unemployment at 3.7%, and wages starting to increase (NYT), so what’s the problem? The Opportunity Index answers that question, and Third Way breaks it down for you. It may be worth the half hour it will...

Reading List for October 20-21

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Oct 19, 2018
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Paying for College, Investing, Economics, Retirement
Paying for College The majority of this week’s articles happen to be related to paying for college: the cost of college, student loan forgiveness, financial aid and how parents pay for college. I have also included a link to Beth Kobliner’s website and her series on paying for college, which you could recommend to parents. After reporting that the “sticker price” of college keeps rising, the WSJ explains that the REAL cost is not. A study by Sallie Mae finds that on...

FinCap Friday: Playing With F.I.R.E.

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Oct 11, 2018
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FinCap Fridays, Retirement, Investing, Index Funds
How can you possibly engage high schoolers in a conversation about retirement? They haven't even gotten their first real job yet so it's not exactly on their radar screen. By highlighting the F.I.R.E. movement (that's Financial Independence, Retire Early) and the extreme examples of retirees in their 30s, we hope that gets your students thinking "How'd they do that?" That should spur a great conversation about savings rates and the importance of investing while you are young. ...

Question of the Day: What percent of investors know the fees they are paying in their 401(k) investment account?

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Oct 03, 2018
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Question of the Day, Investing, Retirement, Research
Answer: 8% Questions: In your own words, what is a 401(k) plan?  Do you think it's important to understand the fees you are paying in an investment account? Why or why not? Given that a 401(k) account is the largest investment account for most Americans, why do you think so few understand what they are paying for it?  Here's the ready-to-go slides for this Question of the Day that you can use in your classroom. Behind the numbers (Visual Capitalist):  Here are the...

Chart of the Week Wednesday: How Many Years Until I Can Retire?

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Oct 03, 2018
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Chart of the Week, Math, Research, Retirement, Investing
From Simple Dollar Blog: We all struggle with how to make retirement interesting to high school students who tend to be short-term oriented. You can use this chart to ask the question "How soon can YOU get to financial independence?"  First, let me provide some orientation: X-axis tracks after-tax annual income Y-axis has annual spending Number inside the grid are years until financial independence For example, a recent college grad with after-tax pay of $35k ($35,000) who spends $20k...

Reading List for September 22-23

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Sep 21, 2018
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Economics, Personal Finance, Retirement
Ten-Year Anniversary of Lehman failure/Great Recession Coverage continued through the weekend on this event, so here are just a few more good articles on the subject.  A special section of Sunday’s New York Times was devoted to the ten-year anniversary of the financial crisis. Here is one of the articles on where the next recession may come from. Along those lines, economics wonks are looking around every corner for the trigger for the next crisis. Business Insider brings you Martin...

Reading List for September 15-16

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Sep 14, 2018
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Current Events, Economics, Paying for College, Financial Literacy, Identity Theft, Retirement
Included a few extra articles this week as we recognize the ten-year anniversary of the Lehman failure and start of the Great Recession.....and a collection on paying for college as we start the new school year. Ten Year anniversary of Lehman failure What have we learned? Neil Irwin in his UpShot article compares current times to the 1990s looking for lessons. The WSJ looks back at how the Great Recession changed our relationship with risk. This WSJ/The Outlook discusses if the Fed has new...

Question of the Day: How much do millennials spend annually on coffee?

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Sep 09, 2018
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Budgeting, Behavioral Finance, Retirement, Question of the Day, Investing
Answer: $2,008 Thanks to Lynn Fischer of Kimberly High School (WI) for recommending this Question of the Day!  Questions: Assuming that they buy a coffee every day of the year (365 days in a year), what would be the daily cost of a cup of coffee?  What are ways that millennials could reduce their cost of coffee without going "cold turkey" and not drinking it anymore?  Are there things that you buy on a daily basis that would add up to hundreds of dollars spent on an annual basis?...

NGPF Podcast: Tim Talks To 403(b) Crusader Steve Schullo

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Aug 03, 2018
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Podcasts, Retirement, Investing, Stocks, Index Funds
  Ten years into his retirement, former LAUSD elementary school teacher and author Steve Schullo is still fighting the good fight for teacher retirement plans. This go-getter shares the insights from his teaching career and his passion to fix the current 403(b) mess. As the author of Late Bloomer Millionaire, you will learn how Steve's savings and investing plan helped him achieve a healthy nest egg. Listeners will also learn why he wrote Fighting Powerful Interests and the changes he...

What I'm Reading this Weekend (July 14-15)

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Jul 13, 2018
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Current Events, Economics, Investing, Paying for College, Internships, Retirement
Economics Inflation ticked up in June to 2.9%, the highest level in 6 years. What does that mean for workers? (see Chart of the Week below) Rare earth metals, critical in production of Americans’ extra appendage (cellphones), come from China. How will the trade wars with China impact this market?  Higher Ed and News for Recent Grads The state of student loan debt in words and pictures! Berklee College of Music finds success by bucking the trend and making its Online program a...

What I'm Reading This Weekend - July 7-8

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Jul 06, 2018
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Current Events, Economics, Student Loans, Personal Finance, Retirement
Economy This detailed Vox article explains what recent Supreme Court rulings at the end of this term mean for American business and the future of Antitrust. Economics nerds will enjoy the good examples of monopoly and monopsony here. How do American workers fare compared to their counterparts across the world? Maybe not so well. “Only Spain and Greece, whose economies have been ravaged by the euro-zone crisis, have more households earning less than half the nation’s median income...

Digging Deeper: Retirement’s Difficult Choices (Part 2)

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Jun 25, 2018
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Retirement, Insurance
Planning for Health Care Expenses High on my retirement planning “to do” list has been to make a call on whether or not to get long-term care insurance. I have been procrastinating mightily on this one. So when I read an article outlining a new model for assessing health care costs in retirement (long-term care insurance is part of this equation) put together for Vanguard by Mercer Health Benefits, it pushed the issue back onto my regular “to do” list. Time is money,...

What I'm Reading This Weekend (June 9-10)

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Jun 08, 2018
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Current Events, Parent Conversations, Retirement, Credit Reports, Investing, Mortgages
Parenting The WSJ takes a good look at the overprotected American child. You probably see the impacts on the students you teach. Michelle Singletary explains why parents should have “the talk” (about credit) with their kids. Here are eight things parents can do to help their college students become financially independent. And here is what you do if your adult children want to move home. Education The New York Times looks at education spending over time.  (Hint: it...

Another Way to Reframe That Retirement Conversation: A Dollar Spent Today Could Be Worth .... In The Future?

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May 28, 2018
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Retirement, Compound Interest, Teaching Strategies
Thanks to Brian Page for sharing this rule of 72 example from his class. Might get your students to be more mindful about their spending and saving habits.      ...